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20130121
20130129
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. king worked with other civil rights lead towers bring the movement for equality not just for the south, but throughout the nation. >> i still have a dream. >> yes. >> it is deeply rooted in the american dream. >> mike: in 1963, dr. king brought the march to washington and announced his dream for all to hear. >> i have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of this creed. the children who will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. >> mike: the power of those words forced washington to take action and a year later, the civil rights act of 1964 became law. making it illegal for federal and state governments to discriminate based on color, sex, or religion. dr. king's mission brought him to selma, alabama in 1965. he attempted to lead a march to the state's capitol, but mob and police violence forced them to stop. that day became known as bloody sunday. >> somewhere i read of the freedom of speech. somewhere i read of the freedom of press. somewhere
? >> a heart as big as the world. >> john bellcastor was barack obama's law partner doing civil rights work in chicago from 1993 to 2003. >> in our law firm he never raised his voice. the no drama obama you hear about today was that way back in 1993. >> and dotting the crowd the young celebrities drawn to obama. katie berry and john mayer and jeffrey wright who spoke of the hope of the day. >> it's about the hope of the country and the example we set to the world in terms of free and working democracy. and it's about partnership and it's about what you know, the common ground between all of us as americans. and so, you know, if this doesn't illustrate that then we have a lot of hard work to do. >> and the musical artists mostly represented the young 21st century artists like kelly clarkson. ♪ >> and an obama favorite and friend, beyonce. ♪ for the ramparts we watched ♪ were so gallantly streaming >> we the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal. it is the star that guides us still. just as it guided our forebearers through seneca falls
grew up to be a civil rights lawyer. he worked for the independent congratulation of schools. in 1977, he became the first african-american mayor of richmond, virginia. he has served in the virginia state senate since 1992. only two active senators have served in that chamber longer than he has. senator marsh wanted to see the inauguration of this president on martin luther king day. mr. marsh is 79 years old. it seems unlikely that there will be an inauguration quite like this again any time soon. so for a day, henry marsh left behind the virginia state senate. the virginia state senate i should tell you stands at an even 20-20. it is equally divided, half republicans and half democrats. 20 on one side, 20 on the other. and while senator marsh was away on this within day while he was at the inauguration, the republicans in the senate decided to do this. surprise! we're going to redraw virginia's state senate districts with no warning, while you were out, we're going to do this. ta-da. the associated press says, quote, state senate republicans have muscled a surreptitious redraft of v
martin luther king jr. stood for civil rights, non-violence organized labor social justice and ending war. today america usually remembers one out of five. i'll start with you tom why is that? >> we all take from dr. king and larger than life figures what we choose to, and sometimes there is an interest involved like avoiding his strong criticism of the vietnam war in 1967, which was very unpopular at the time with some of the black ministers, with the "new york times," with organized labor with much of the democratic party. and yet it set in motion the events that led to the challenging of lyndon johnson. so i think unfortunately history becomes political, and we pick and choose what we refer to emphasize, but dr. king was gradual. he was slow to come to an open stance. he knew what the stakes were. he wasn't unaware. he wasn't innocent. he knew he would have trouble taking that position, and he took it forthrightly, and proudly, and stayed with it. >> john: kris let me ask you the same question. do you think that another great tragedy of dr. king's loss is he's only remembered as a civi
freedom. >> cenk: he connected it to the civil rights and women's rights m. that was a moment today and one you should soak in. there were moments that i thought were--let's just put it this way ironic. >> obama: this generation of americans has been tested by crises that test our resolve and prove our resilience. the decade of war is just ending. >> cenk: only if it were so. there was recently a statement put out that basically the war on terror will continue indefinitely at least for another ten years but probably much longer than that, and by the way we had another drone strike in yemen today as president obama was saying that the war is coming to an end interesting. and then here is the issue of politics and the central theme of the campaign. remember how paul ryan and mitt romney talked about the takers? well the president addressed that. >> obama: we recognize that no matter how responsibly we live our lives any one of us at any time may face a job loss or a sudden illness or a home swept away in a terrible storm. the commitments we make to each other through medicare and medi
with civil rights just generally human rights and i think you see coalitions building that you didn't see in the past. people who didn't necessarily see lbgt rights as being on par with other rights. >> right. he has changed the conversation that fair is fair. >> fair is fair -- >> stephanie: no you wrote this. you had a great piece in the "the advocate" about this. the american people -- even if some people have a little -- i don't know if i really like gays, it's still fair is fair. and this is not fair and not equal. >> yeah, exactly. there's still a little squeakiness from some people but i still got a little bit of a you people vibe from some people yesterday, but you can tell that they are growing in their understanding of what is fair, what is equal. >> stephanie: right. >> and that notion of fairness is expanding to include factors that people hadn't considered in the past. gender identity is one of those things that we are going to have to tackle. >> i suspect scalia was instrumental in that. god, dad. i have no idea why she talks like a valley girl. oh, go
, the civil rights movement, to stonewall, the great inclusion of gay rights, the gay rights movement. those are critical. but we also have a political system that is too controlled by corporate power, and that is the fight of the 21st century. >> all right. katrina vanden heuvel. great to have you with us on the program tonight. >> thank you. >> thank you so much. remember, to answer tonight's question. share your thoughts with us on twitter at edshow and on facebook. we want to know what you think. >>> coming up, the aggressive agenda american support, it isn't going to amount to anything if we can't get a meaningful filibuster reform to take place in the senate. the latest developments with senator jeff merkley, who joins me next. stay with us. [ dad ] find it? ya. alright, another one just like that. right in the old bucket. good toss! see that's much better! that was good. you had your shoulder pointed, you kept your eyes on your target. let's do it again -- watch me. just like that one... [ male announcer ] the durability of the volkswagen passat. pass down something he will be gratefu
are going to be eight floats dedicated to the first and second families and then also civil rights, one specifically dedicated to martin luther king jr. of course, the first lady and president obama will round out all these festivities and an entire weekend full of celebration with the two balls, up to 40,000 people are expected to attend the inaugural balls. many cannot wait to find out what the first lady will wear. i'm danielle leigh, back to you. >> thank you. >>> nbc meteorologist now with the forecast. we know for sure she is supporting some bangs. >> it looks awesome. >> i love it. >> i think she's wearing them very well. probably jacket of some sort, too. it will be a little chilly. got news is it's not going to be as cold as initially thought. the coldest of the air is going to hold off until tomorrow. that's good news. and we are going to see a few flurries. that will make it look real pretty, especially in the nation's capital. it is looking like a decent day. mix of sun and clouds with a few flurries. temperatures look just fine. here's where the cold air is. it dropped now
would all fly. it was so magnificent for him to take the spirit of dr. king the civil rights movement, take the american story and including everybody in it from our newest americans to our oldest citizens, and when he said our social safety net does not make us weak you could hear the oh throughout the whole crowd. >> jennifer: where were you christine? >> i was up to the president's right. we had a great view of the president and it was really really exciting. we were sitting right near artist john legend and cindy lopper both of who are very active in the community. we were all just cheering practically every line so we were a bit of a rowdy bunch but we were very very excited to be there, and looking out and seeing all of those people it was really really special and wonderful. >> jennifer: yeah, bill, i completely agree with everything, and the thing that struck me bill was that he really spoke clearly about income inequality you don't hear presidents often talking about poverty directly, and i was really encouraged by that. >> yeah what a contrast if m
in his inaugural, while talking about the struggle for civil rights. >> for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. >> reporter: the president insisting we address climate change, and on immigration, arguing we should welcome striving immigrants. >> until bright young students and engineers are enlisted in our work force, rather than expelled from our country. >> reporter: were there powerful performances, kelly clarkson's stirring rendition of "my country tis of thee." ♪ to thee we sing >> reporter: beyonce returning four years later, this time, to sing the national anthem. ♪ and the rockets red glare ♪ the bombs bursting in air ♪ gave proof through the night ♪ that our flag was still there ♪ >> reporter: and as the president made his exit up those steps, a pause. turning around to take in his final inaugural moment. one more time. a microphone picking up what he said. >> i want to take a look one more time. i'm not going to see this again. >> reporter: and as the first couple made their way back to the white house,
for a moment of reflection in front of a bust of the civil rights leader at the capitol rotunda. he was joined by the first lady and congressional leaders. >>> but the president wasn't the only one in the spotlight on monday. first daughters malia and sasha obama had quite a few scene-stealing moments of their own. the normally reserved malia let loose a little bit, busting out dance moves for her mom before the swearing-in. and 11-year-old sasha created an instant viral video, yawning during her dad's presidential address right after a line about education policy. the girls also used their phones to take lots of photos of their family during the event. and at one point malia even photobombed her younger sister. yeah, sisters do that to each other. >>> before leaving the inaugural platform as the center of attention for the very last time, president obama had the presence of mind to stop and take in the moment. >> one more time. i'm not going to see this again. >> great job. ♪ >>> meanwhile, the "today" show's al roker had this unforgettable moment with vice president joe biden while coverin
's the critical part of it, right? when they dig in with their civil lawsuit they unearth more stuff as we found out today in the morgan stanley case. why didn't the government dig in? and let me pause at a theory for you and get your reaction to it. one, these guys give a tremendous amount of money to politicians. dick durban said frankly they own the place and he's the second more senior senator for the democrats in the senate. and they're all in the same circle. attorney general eric holder doesn't think waaaa i'm going to do deals that's my friend bob. i just represented him the other day. i'm not going to put bob in jail. >> there are a lot of political appointees. here eric holder and then lanny brewer chief of the criminal division of justice the man who sits at the crux of all this. there are a lot of justice attorneys who would love nothing more than to bring down a major banger, a major wall street player put a notch on their belt. that's a counter veiling to reality. you say without support from above it's hard for them to act and i think that's very likely true. on the other hand i t
groups and civil rights groups and some scholars is that we put together this omnibus road to electoral reform bill. it's 199 pages long. it has over 50 important changes, and you named some of them all right. and what we're doing is saying as far as we've come already voting still has a little bit more perfection. we can make it better, make it easier, make it friendly to the voters. that's what some people in politics don't want to do, but that's what those of us that are 160 in number, including senator kirsten gillibrand in new york just introduced, and we'll have our work cut out for us to make the election fair and easier for the american citizen. >> john: is this designed to help democratic voters or do both parties try to play dirty tricks with each other's voters? have democrats tried to suppress republican votes as well? >> we're not angels on the democratic side, but i cannot name you one instance to document that. i don't know about it. and look, all republicans are not all bad guys. a lot of these things are being done by their political organizations by a few elected offic
important. >> an inaugural is obviously history. >> there is a strong theme of civil rights. >> america's possibilities are limitless. it is now our generation's task to carry on. >> this speech was about an action plan. >> we cannot mistake absolutism for principle, or treat name-calling as debate. we must act. >> things will get back to what we see as normal. >> today is a day to celebrate the democracy. >> my fellow americans, we are made for this moment. and we will seize it so long as we seize it together. >> for the first time in recent history, today a giant event in washington ran a few minutes early. and ten minutes before noon, chief justice john roberts administered the oath of office to the president, and he delivered the second inaugural address which lasted just over 18 minutes. >> for our journeys are not complete until our wives and mothers and daughters can earn a living equal to their efforts. our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to on
of the civil rights act and the voting changes that occurred then. but since then, we've heard no mention of the right to vote in this country being a protected right and the sanctity of that idea. i think the only thing -- first of all, we gotta remember, we vote every two years in this country. not every four. that needs to be the refrain from -- every time you talk about an election, anybody within the sound of my voice needs to -- when they talk about voting or any of those things or what's going to happen in the next election, you're not talking about 2016. you're talking about 2014. those often matter more so because that's when they sneak these folks through. that's when purple districts turn red because people are look the other way or are too busy. thanks for the call. appreciate it. we'll be back right after this. more of "the stephanie miller show". celebrating her mom's 90th birthday. >> she'll be back tomorrow though. >> she will. >> i'm sorry. that's inappropriate. >> announcer: it's "the stephanie miller show." desmond tutu said a quote that is one of my favorite quotes. "w
's rights which later led to a women's right to vote, of course. selma, alabama, the city where civil rights denl straighters fought for voting rights for african-americans in the march of 1965 only to be met violently by armed state troopers in a day that has since been known as bloody sunday. and the stonewall inn often thought of the birth place of the lgbt rights after a gay bar was raided by police in 1969 and for days became the site of protests and riots. here is the president yesterday. >> we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal, is the star that guides us still just as it guided our forbearers through seneca falls and selma and stonewall, just as it guided all those men and women sung and unsung who left footprints along this great mall to hear a preacher say that we cannot walk alone. to hear a king proclaim that our individual freedom is inextricably bound to the freedom of every soul on earth. >> the iconic nature of that speech, we americans love brands. we love iconic moments whether it's the golden gate bridge or niagara
life, but to me it is my human right, my civil right to decide what medicines i take, to be able to consult with my doctor and decide what medical procedures are appropriate for me, for my body or my family. we've seen some of the most outrageous measures at the state level, even here at the federal level after trying to convince us there was no war on women last year. what was some of the first legislation we saw being put forward? defunding planned parenthood. they're trying to go back to that again. not to mention these personhood amendments. and i think part of the challenge here for the pro-choice movement and i think part of what we saw last year is women around this country and men as well because we always saw that in key battleground states this is a top voting issue for women. naral did a poll during the election and found this. i think women and men are understanding this is about our human rights, this is about our rights to control our destiny, but there's also an element of health care to this. we've got the president's health care bill being implemented, preventati
, the virginia republicans have been quite busy this week. on monday during the president's inauguration, civil rights icon in virginia, first african-american mayor of richmond and a state senator decided to attend the president's inauguration. and the republicans in the senate took advantage of his absence on mlk day, as well, to push through a partisan gerrymandered version of the state senate districts. they made all the democratic districts worse and they really targeting deeds the gubernatorial nominee last time ago who represents a rural district and if this new map becomes law, would actually lose his seat because of this. so they're really doing everything they can to sort of game the system in virginia. >> well, you know, i think a couple of things. i think it should be noted that since the beginning of our young nation, democrats have done some things to manipulate the system. >> sure. >> at times, as well. every party, minority, majority, wants to win and they do what they have to to win. not an excuse. just a fact. too, i think some of this is hyperbole. nebraska and maine doing th
history. the pioneers went over the rocky mountains. we got through world war ii. we did the civil rights movement. they did it, not we. i mean we that's the whole point. the civil rights movement the gay rights movement the womens movement came from below and leaders responded. it's never coming from the top down. usually change comes from the bottom up. that's where the we is. >> lincoln's second inaugural address was something like 701 words or something. i believe he used the word "i" once in the speech. so could a president these days give a 700-word inaugural address? please? >> we would love it. that means you have to have that poetic compression. linkeningen linkcoln was a writer that knew how to make these things little. we would have to talk more. oh my god. >> doris, let me ask you a question. i want to follow up on this but i want to make sure it's a fair thing to ask. that's the great they think about "morning joe." >> uh-oh. here he goes. >> the great thing about "morning joe" is -- >> what are you doing? >> we fly without -- >> are you thinking? >> we ign
is the gay struggle, the lgbt struggle for equality is it the next civil rights movement. he linked those two together. then of course moving on and mentioning marriage equality for all americans. a position he came to just several months ago. really really powerful stuff. >> bill: huge reaction from the crowd. the president talked about climate change. didn't do much about it. talked about it when he was running in 2008. didn't do much about it in his first term. but he spent more time, more sentences talking about it. about climate change than any other single issue. do we have that? >> obama: we will respond to the threat of climate change. knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations. [ cheers & applause ] >> bill: the president also in one of those sentences took it back to the bible and said we have a god-given mandate to -- which we do in genesis one and genesis 3 to preserve our planet and take care of our planet. >> it really sounded like he was trying to split off the republican coalition. get the practical republicans some of the evangelicals w
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)